WE SUPPORT INNOVATORS TO EMPOWER INCLUSIVE GROWTH

 

 

Inclusive Innovators have sustainable business models that widen social impact by growing the economy.
They tap into the pool of usable and science and technologies to offer affordable products and services to all and to be used by all

 

 

 

 

WHAT WE DO

We use the donations we receive, to support inclusive innovation through grant funding, technical training and independent certicification projects and companies that are creating solutions to environmental and social challenges.

 

 

 

 

 

WHAT WE LOOK FOR

We seek a diverse portfolio of people, organizations, academic programs, and projects from around the world that :

  • Use Innovation in an inclusive way;
  • Are committed to social  impact;
  • Have scalable models;
  • Have visionary and talented leaders.

 

 

 

 

 

LATEST BLOG ARTICLES

The Kuznets Curve and Inequality over the last 100 Years

The Kuznets curve, formulated by Simon Kuznets in the mid-1950s, argues that in preindustrial societies, almost everybody is equally poor so inequality is low.

The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel first started being given in 1969, the backlog of worthy economists who were deserving of the prize was very large. Thus, it was a considerable compliment when the third Nobel prize given in economics went to Simon Kuznets in 1971. Among other major contributions, Kuznets was one of the primary contributors to thinking through the issues of constructing national income accounts and GDP. But my focus here is on a theory which grew out of his Presidential Address on “Economic Growth and Income,” delicvered to the American Economic Association in 1954 and published in the March 1955 issue of the American Economic Review. This lecture led economists to speak of a “Kuznets curve.”

Here’s a short explanation of the logic behind the Kuznets curve from Branko Milanovic in the September 2011 issue of Finance and Development has several articles with perspectives on inequality. “The Kuznets curve, formulated by Simon Kuznets in the mid-1950s, argues that in preindustrial societies, almost everybody is equally poor so inequality is low. Inequality then rises as people move from low-productivity agriculture to the more productive industrial sector, where average income is higher and wages are less uniform. But as a society matures and becomes richer, the urban-rural gap is reduced and old-age pensions, unemployment benefits, and other social transfers lower inequality. So the Kuznets curve resembles an upside-down `U.'”

In 2011, of course, the notion that inequality always declines as an economy grows no longer seems plausible. Later in the same issue, Facundo Alvaredo offers some nice figures of trends in inequality around the world since about 1900, where inequality is measured by the share of total income going to the top 1% of the income distribution. There are four figures, each with a group of countries. “In Western English-speaking countries, inequality declined until about 1980 and then began to grow again. Continental European countries and Japan had a decline until about 1950; since then income distribution has leveled. For Nordic and Southern European countries, the drop in inequality in the
early part of the century was much more pronounced than the rebound in the late part of the period. Developing countries show initial declines in inequality followed by a leveling off in some cases and an increase in inequality in others.”

 

 

 

Article by Timothy Taylor
[email protected]

NURX, the UBER for birth control

Nurx offers a platform that delivers contraceptives directly to customers’ doorsteps and allows women to skip physical doctor’s appointments, offering online access to a network of doctors and pharmacies that have partnered with the company. It’s a business plan that’s also drawn the support of Chelsea Clinton, who will join Nurx’s board as part of the new funding.The San Francisco-based Nurx was founded in 2015 with a focus on providing contraceptives to the huge number of women who are without access to care, including those who live in “contraceptive deserts” and other areas with clinic shortages. More than 19 million women in the US between the ages of 13 and 44 don’t have access to clinics that provide publicly funded birth control, according to The Campaign to Prevent Unplanned Pregnancy.

Late Capitalism

The term “late capitalism”, first used by German economist Werner Sombart in the early-1900s, is coming back into vogue. The phrase is increasingly being used to describe the problems facing the modern global economy. These include gaping inequalities of wealth, stagnant real wages, aggressive and convoluted tax avoidance by global corporations, surveillance by tech firms, abuses of human and workers’ rights, rip-off products sold by the finance sector, and environmental destruction such as the transformation of the oceans into a dumping ground for plastic waste.

There are plenty of scapegoats for such ills. But inadequate corporate governance and, in particular, investors’ and corporations’ obsession with short-term performance are increasingly being seen as among the root causes. And a growing band of investors believe they’ve found a cure.

The thinking is that, if environmental, social and governance (ESG) factors are ingrained in investors’ thinking, then a triple-win will follow – more valuable companies, more value for end-investors and, ultimately, a more sustainable system.

Source and read more here

 

Going Social: Why Businesses Must Invest More in Human Capital

According to a fresh study released by Deloitte Insights, there’s a new metric being used to measure the success of an enterprise. Millennials and members of Gen-Z actively seek employers who are socially responsible. This means one of the primary and immediate benefits of going social and investing in human capital is that you’ll attract and retain better talent. Even better, this will be young talent poised to grow with your organization. 30% of these employees say they work more efficiently when they are employed by organizations that prioritize a social cause. This could lead to the next benefit.Businesses that invest in human capital and are moving towards socially responsible growth models may choose to give back through charitable donations. However, doing so does not mean they are following an inclusive growth model, according to data from Aston University. Instead, the move should be towards making business decisions in every area from product development to hiring to sales and marketing with a focus on ensuring that decisions made have the potential to have an environmental, economic, and social benefit to the community.
Now more than ever, successful enterprises will need to focus on human capital and social responsibility. Growth, success, and the ability to retain talent depends on them doing so.

 

 

Read full article by Dorothy Mitchell HERE

 

INCLUSIVE INNOVATORS

Inclusive Innovators have sustainable business models that widen social impact by growing the economy.
By tapping into the pool of usable and science and technologies to offer affordable products and services to all and to be used by all

Inclusive innovators that offer financial inclusion solutions

FarmDrive, a Kenyan enterprise, connects unbanked and underserved smallholder farmers to credit, while helping financial institutions cost-effectively increase their agricultural loan portfolios.

Inclusive Innovators with an impact on health for all

RogerVoice helps the deaf and hard of hearing make phone calls. Their clients are call centers and telecom carriers.

Inclusive Innovators with an impact on agricultural output for all

Gamaya, a Swiss agtech startup developing proprietary hyperspectral imaging technology, using drones, to provide farmers insights about their fields.

Inclusive Innovators with an impact on a cleaner world

UBQ created a revolutionary way to take ordinary household waste, including organics, that cannot be recycled, and convert it into a new worldwide-patented material that can be used to make the kind of familiar products people use every day.

NURX, the UBER for birth control

Nurx offers a platform that delivers contraceptives directly to customers' doorsteps and allows women to skip physical doctor's appointments, offering online access to a network of doctors and pharmacies that have partnered with the company. It's a business plan...

Ari.Farm

News from Ari.Farm,  one of our selected Inclusive Innovators In November we have been fully focused on scaling and improving our operations in Somalia. As we have communicated in October we have now registered a local company with an office in Mogadishu. Our team has...

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We leverage the power of entrepreneurship and innovation to help people be fully part of 4th Industrial revolution in a more inclusive society. As a international NGO, your financial support is critical to help us act as a catalyst to empower inclusive innovators to develop innovation which can help people increase their incomes, provide health, be trained to fit with the job needs.